Sea Technology

JAN 2018

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22 ST | January 2018 www.sea-technology.com Guard is the visible presence in the Arctic region. As- sured access is the only way we can effectively respond to threats and facilitate emerging commercial activities. To that end, we are working to recapitalize our aged fleet. Our immediate focus is to get the first "heavy" ice- breaker in the water by 2023, before building the sec- ond to reestablish self-rescue capability. Our threshold requirement for year-round access and to support all missions in the Polar regions consists of three heavy and three medium polar icebreakers. These icebreakers must be built and equipped to respond to our current needs while reserving space, weight and power to meet future demands. As an Arctic nation, we must provide visible pres- ence in the high latitudes. History proves that no other investment will return more operational value on each dollar than the extraordinary men and women of the United States Coast Guard. With the continued support of Congress, we must maintain momentum for ongoing icebreaker recapitalization, as it would be a "folly" not to invest in our sovereign interests in the Polar regions. While many challenges remain, the Coast Guard's fu- Guardian," which occurred off the coast of Iceland in September 2017. This governance mechanism provides a unique op- portunity to cooperate with each Arctic nation, and our ability to engage directly with Russia on security issues provides a critical de-escalatory capability in the region. These established relationships continue under the Finn- ish Border Guard chairmanship of the ACGF, ensuring that this body remains the premier platform for fostering safe, secure and responsible maritime operations in the Arctic. Presence State and nonstate actors alike are posturing to take full advantage of the opening Arctic, which requires di- plomacy and cooperation, along with an appropriate maritime domain awareness footprint. This includes a fleet of polar icebreakers that can provide assured year- round access to exert our sovereign rights, ensure our national security and protect our economic interests. The U.S. Navy maintains a formidable deterrent force underneath and above the Arctic Ocean, but the Coast "State and nonstate actors alike are posturing to take full advantage of the opening Arctic, which requires diplomacy and cooperation, along with an appropriate maritime domain awareness footprint."

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