Sea Technology

JAN 2019

The industry's recognized authority for design, engineering and application of equipment and services in the global ocean community

Issue link: https://sea-technology.epubxp.com/i/1082580

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 13 of 49

14 ST | January 2019 www.sea-technology.com supporting their research to mitigate the globe's ocean plastics disaster. It is time for Congress to back the groundbreaking ef- forts being made at NOAA. Data available to Congress and the public results in more informed decisions that can greatly impact our environment and the health of our people. For the past two decades, annual warm- er-than-average temperature records have reliably been broken. We, both as a nation and globally, must learn about and adapt to our changing environment. Data from our agencies have shown the clear connection between climate change and the increase in severity and frequen- cy of tropical storms. Scientists have made it clear that the severity of glob- al warming will only continue to grow, and if we do not take proper action, we will be left with irreversible, sometimes fatal consequences. Global warming has dire effects on nearly every aspect of our lives. As wildfires scorch our western states and severe weather events drown our coastal cities and towns, it is crucial that we prepare for what is ahead and make the right investments to mitigate the toll global warming is taking on our peo- ple, our environment and our economy. A push for funding and support of research and inno- vation at our NOAA facilities will undoubtedly increase the efficiency of weather forecasting in the United States and ensure that the National Weather Service lives up to its mission of protecting life and property. As chairwom- an of the House Committee on Science, Space, and Tech- nology, I look forward to the possibilities the future holds in engaging with NOAA. The very roots of the Science Committee began in discovery, research and paving the way through uncharted territory. In the 116th Congress, I look forward to getting back to those roots. ST "From climate change to increased plastic pollution to renewed threats of new offshore oil and gas drilling, our oceans face unprecedented challenges. Many of our oceans are experiencing rising sea levels, changes in water temperature, acidification, loss of marine mammal life and fishery declines due to increasing global temperatures." Review&Forecast The Fight to Protect Our National Marine Sanctuaries By Rep. Salud Carbajal (D-Calif.) Member, Congressional Oceans Caucus U.S. House of Representatives O cean waters have helped us curb climate change im- pacts by absorbing harmful heat-trapping gases like carbon diox- ide emissions and gen- erating half the oxygen we breathe. However, if we do not act quickly to protect our ocean's ecosystem, we are risk- ing the health of our entire planet. From climate change to increased plastic pollution to renewed threats of new offshore oil and gas drilling, our oceans face unprecedented challenges. Many of our oceans are experiencing rising sea levels, changes in wa- ter temperature, acidification, loss of marine mammal life and fishery declines due to increasing global tem- peratures. Protecting this unique ecosystem is vital for both our well-being and our economy. As policy makers, we must adopt good-stewardship policies that help preserve our oceans for generations to come. That is why I support our national marine sanctuaries and better ocean manage- ment policies. Our national marine sanctuaries are treasured waters that serve to protect biologically diverse and sensitive habitats like kelp forests, deep-sea canyons and historical archaeological sites. On the Central Coast of California, we are lucky to have the Channel Islands and Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuaries in our own backyard, two of 13 total nationwide. This past summer, I was fortunate enough to tour the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary with a group of 22 Central Coast veterans. During the visit, I learned about the extraordinary conservation efforts being spear- headed by some of our very own veterans, such as Ken Tatro. Tatro served in the United States Navy from 1958 to 1964 and continues to serve our country as a volunteer with the Channel Islands Naturalist Corps. He leads stewardship efforts to protect the sanctuary by educating visitors on the unique resources found within the Chan- nel Islands during whale-watching trips, island hikes and community events—which I had the chance to experi- ence first-hand. Preserving the Channel Islands National Marine Sanc- tuary not only ensures future generations can experience our cherished local treasure, but also strengthens our lo-

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Sea Technology - JAN 2019